Girl Scout Cookies & Beer Pairings

It’s the most wonderful time of the year – stocking your Girl Scout Cookie stash!! We’re pairing some of our favorite Girl Scout cookies with some of our favorite OMNI beers.

Here’s the line up:
Caramel DeLites with Muddy Runner – Coconut Porter
Smores with Daily Dose – Coffee Cream Ale
Lemonades with Loonacy – Belgian Strong Ale
Peanut Butter Sandwiches with Hefeweizen – German Wheat

From 12pm – 5pm on March 10th and 17th we will be serving paired cookie and beer flights for $12–that’s only $2.00 more than our normal flights!

If you would like to take a full box and full growler home with you, you will be able to do that too because cookies will be for sale these days too. The cookie sales will go to support local Brooklyn Park and Champlin troops go to summer camp.

Stay connected with the Facebook event page.

Girl Scout Cookies & Beer Pairings

It’s the most wonderful time of the year – stocking your Girl Scout Cookie stash!! We’re pairing some of our favorite Girl Scout cookies with some of our favorite OMNI beers.

Here’s the line up:
Caramel DeLites with Muddy Runner – Coconut Porter
Smores with Daily Dose – Coffee Cream Ale
Lemonades with Loonacy – Belgian Strong Ale
Peanut Butter Sandwiches with Hefeweizen – German Wheat

From 12pm – 5pm on March 10th and 17th we will be serving paired cookie and beer flights for $12–that’s only $2.00 more than our normal flights!

If you would like to take a full box and full growler home with you, you will be able to do that too because cookies will be for sale these days too. The cookie sales will go to support local Brooklyn Park and Champlin troops go to summer camp.

Stay connected with the Facebook event page.

Urban Growler tapping “cold hopped” cream ale

Photo courtesy of Urban Growler

Photo courtesy of Urban Growler

When a Wisconsinite asks you for the Metro’s closest approximation to New Glarus Spotted Cow, a solid bet is to point them towards Urban Growler‘s Cowbell Cream Ale. Now, one of their newest releases is taking that solid foundation, and getting hoppy with it.

Their Hayloft Series™ Cold Hopped Imperial Cream Ale is a cross between an IPA and a cream ale. The beer is dry-hopped with Cascade hops that were added while the beer was cold. The result, according to the brewers, is a “crisp, fresh, smooth hop character.”

Also upcoming at Urban Growler, a special beer brewed in honor of the 500 year anniversary of the Reinheitsgebot (German Purity Law), to be tapped April 24th at 11:00 am.


The Mill Post Bottom Graphic

Urban Growler on Grand Opening, Carnitas, and more

Brian Kaufenberg // The Growler Magazine

Brian Kaufenberg // The Growler Magazine

Urban Growler Brewing Co. has announced an official grand opening. On Wednesday, August 27th, they’ll host Mayor Coleman, plus live music on the patio, special beers, giveaways and more. We caught up with Deb Loch and Jill Pavlak (second and third from left, respectively) to get the details.

Current Taproom Hours: Urban Growler has been soft open for a number of weeks now, but people are still calling them up asking when they’ll open. Hitch a ride on the Green Line and check them out. [Wed-Thu 4-9pm, Fri 3-10pm, Sat noon-10pm, Sun noon-8pm.]

The Beer: Brewer Deb Loch is brewing up approachable styles – currently all around 5% ABV. Her flagship Cowbell Cream Ale is a smooth, flavorful “transition beer” to convert the macro drinkers. She’ll have her Graffiti IPA (an English-style Rye-PA) on hand for the grand opening. They’re also featuring local ingredients through their Plow to Pint series – currently a hazy, astringent Rhubarb Wit. They plan to begin distribution to bars and restaurants sometime this fall.

The Food: We had no idea there was going to be a permanent kitchen at Urban Growler. But lo and behold, we walked into the brewery recently to the sweet smell of carnitas marinated in Urban Growler brew. Chef Paul Suhreptz has assembled a tight collection of sandwiches, with some artichoke dip and a few salads. Expect the menu to change based on availability of local ingredients.

The Identity: Leading up to its opening, we’d always hear Urban Growler prefaced as the first female-owned brewery in Minnesota. But we’d felt like that was a poor way to pigeonhole a brewery once it’s opened. So what does it really mean for the brewery experience? “It’s about little touches,” Pavlak tells us. “We spent a good amount on HVAC, both heating and cooling, purse hooks at the bar, and chairs you can hang them on without falling off. This place doesn’t scream ‘ladies’, instead, it’s the details that they’ll appreciate.”

Urban Growler Brewing, 2325 Endicott St., St. Paul. 651.340.5793.

Landing at Read’s Landing Brewing Company

Straight from the Source explores the past and present of beautiful Read’s Landing.

By Doug Hoverson
Photos courtesy of Minnesota Historical Society and Doug Hoverson

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While still scenic, Reads Landing isn’t what it used to be. Once a thriving river town, only one of the buildings pictured in an 1873 photo of Upper Main Street still exists. Today that historic dry goods store houses Reads Landing Brewing Company.

A few years ago Bob Nihart, proprietor and brewer, decided he wanted a career change. The old store, in his family since the 1930s and serving as a family cabin, seemed like a good location for a brewpub. The building, which has an unobstructed view of the Mississippi River, was a bar for about fifteen years until the mid-1950s, and then became the original site of the Anchor Inn restaurant. Remodeling the structure caused numerous headaches. It was necessary to dig out the old cellar to make it deep enough for the brewing equipment, but the day before the concrete arrived, a flood washed out much of their work. Meanwhile, Nihart went to the Siebel Institute in Chicago to take the brewpub management class, purchased and installed a three-barrel brewing system, and started designing recipes. The restaurant opened in 2011, and brewing began during the summer of 2012.

Related Post: Boom Island Brewing Company’s New Digs

On a recent visit, there were four house beers available. All were well-made session beers: Cremona Cream Ale, Wagmu Pumpkin Ale, American House Pale Ale, and Grumpy Old Dunkel(weizen). Some of the names have local connections. American House was once an important hotel in town, and the comedy Grumpy Old Men was set nearby on Lake Pepin. Session beers dominate the lineup because the system is not big enough to contain the grain necessary to make a higher gravity beer. Nihart hopes to come up with a solution and offer a bigger beer soon. He enjoys showcasing hops. Both the cream ale and pumpkin ale had more hop flavor than is standard for the styles, but the result was enjoyable. Some of the beers rotate according to season, and Nihart plans to use the natural winter temperature of the cellar to lager a bock for the spring.

The kitchen at Reads Landing Brewing Co. is very small, so chef Casey Mehrkens has created a smaller menu that features locally-sourced items. There are several nice touches, including using spent brewing grains in the bratwurst buns. About 25% of the customers are from the local area. The rest come from around the region to watch the eagles, watch the river flow by, and watch a beer being poured for them Straight From the Source.

Tasting Notes

 American House Pale Ale

English Malts, Target and Willamette hops, finished with Cascade

ABV: 5.2%, IBU: 45

If you were able to try Boston Beer Company’s recreation of Jack McAuliffe’s New Albion Ale, you may find American House Pale Ale similar. The rounded malt profile has a bit of caramel and bread and provides a base to let the hops shine. The aroma showcases the typical Pacific Northwest characteristics of citrus and resin, though restrained in comparison to some of the hop bombs. Medium hop bitterness, with some tangerine in the flavor.