Harlem Globetrotters

Featuring some of the most elite dunkers on the planet, exceptional ball handlers, and Guinness World Records™ record holders, a Globetrotters game is more than just basketball – it’s the ultimate in family entertainment that will bring smiles and fan interaction to people of all ages. The Globetrotters will share their unrivaled show to fans in over 250 North American cities during their upcoming tour.

The Globetrotters show will feature a star-studded roster, including Showmen Big Easy Lofton, Hi-Lite Bruton, Ant Atkinson, and Hammer Harrison, as well as fan favorites Firefly Fisher, Bull Bullard, Thunder Law and Cheese Chisholm.

To match the growing popularity of the Globetrotters’ female stars, the team will also bring the largest female roster in team history to fans across North America – including TNT Lister, Hoops Green, Torch George, Swish Young, and Mighty Mortimer. After every game, the Harlem Globetrotters remain on the court for autographs and photographs with fans.

2019 EVENT SCHEDULE
Saturday, March 30 at 1pm
Sunday, March 31 at 2pm
(Doors open 1 hour prior to each game)

Harlem Globetrotters

Featuring some of the most elite dunkers on the planet, exceptional ball handlers, and Guinness World Records™ record holders, a Globetrotters game is more than just basketball – it’s the ultimate in family entertainment that will bring smiles and fan interaction to people of all ages. The Globetrotters will share their unrivaled show to fans in over 250 North American cities during their upcoming tour.

The Globetrotters show will feature a star-studded roster, including Showmen Big Easy Lofton, Hi-Lite Bruton, Ant Atkinson, and Hammer Harrison, as well as fan favorites Firefly Fisher, Bull Bullard, Thunder Law and Cheese Chisholm.

To match the growing popularity of the Globetrotters’ female stars, the team will also bring the largest female roster in team history to fans across North America – including TNT Lister, Hoops Green, Torch George, Swish Young, and Mighty Mortimer. After every game, the Harlem Globetrotters remain on the court for autographs and photographs with fans.

2019 EVENT SCHEDULE
Saturday, March 30 at 1pm
Sunday, March 31 at 2pm
(Doors open 1 hour prior to each game)

No Labels, No Limits: Individuals of all ages, shapes, and identities are proving that fitness is for every body

From left to right, Molly Lethert, Laurie Woodbury, Caley Danek and Dylan Galos // Photos by Nate Ryan

From left to right, Molly Lethert, Laurie Woodbury, Carly Danek, and Dylan Galos // Photos by Nate Ryan

When she was 9 years old, Molly Lethert was in a snowmobile accident that severed her foot. Doctors were able to reattach it, but the resulting arthritis got worse every year.

“Once I had my accident, year after year something got taken away,” Lethert says. “I couldn’t jump, so I couldn’t do basketball. I lost range of motion, so I quit softball. I was fine when I was on the bike, but when I got off of it, I was so stiff.” Finally, after 40 surgeries, Lethert elected to have her foot amputated in 2017. Her life completely transformed for the better.

Now 50 years old, Lethert has used her prosthetic foot to tackle all the athletic activities she hadn’t been able to do since she was 9. Last summer she participated in a five-day U.S. Olympic training program in Colorado Springs, where she met and trained with Rio 2016 Paralympic Games gold medalist Allysa Seely and silver medalist Hailey Danz (both in the paratriathlon), as well as Team USA paratriathlon coaches. Through Dare2Tri, a nonprofit that works with athletes with physical disabilities to develop their skills in paratriathlon, she met and now trains with Rio paratriathlon bronze medalist Melissa Stockwell. Additionally in 2018 Lethert ran the YWCA SuperSprint triathlon and two other triathlons. She plans to participate in additional triathlons in the coming year. “If I had known 20 years ago how awesome my life would be by amputating, I would have done it then,” she says. “It’s the best feeling in the world.”

Lethert working out // Photo by Nate Ryan

Lethert working out // Photo by Nate Ryan

Lethert’s story is just one example of how the world of fitness is finally becoming a little less siloed, mirroring trends that are happening in almost every other sphere—from fashion, to pop culture, to literature and politics. Representation matters, whether it’s a Somali woman elected to U.S. Congress, fashion models with Down Syndrome walking down the runway, or Young Adult authors of all ethnicities striving to make children’s literature more diverse. Likewise, fitness and wellness are moving beyond narrow expectations of who gets to participate—and thrive.

Fat biking at any age

Fat bike enthusiast Laurie Woodbury is “a child of Title IX,” she says, referring to the landmark U.S. law passed in 1972. “Prior to Title IX, my school had nothing for girls other than the G.A.A. (Girls’ Athletic Association), where once a week we donned our gym suits and played whatever sport we could in the gym. Kind of like gym class extra credit.” Thanks to the law’s passage, Woodbury swam and ran competitively her senior year, 1973, and also swam in college. 

Woodbury met her late husband in the 1980s through the triathlon scene, but as they got older they moved into other sports like mountain biking and, later, fat biking. When her husband passed away last July, Woodbury found solace in a group of women in their 50s and 60s who enjoy hitting the trails in all kinds of weather. They’ve been to Cable, Wisconsin; Grand Marais; and Duluth, biking even when the temperature clocks in below zero. “Biking is the thing I find to be most therapeutic and mind clearing as I grieve the loss of my husband after 32 years,” Woodbury says. “I am trying to figure out who I am now. […] Biking is the one thing that makes me feel real.” 

Woodbury with her fat bike // Photo by Nate Ryan

Woodbury with her fat bike // Photo by Nate Ryan

As someone who has ridden her bike with men, swam with men, and done triathlons with men, Woodbury feels comfortable in mixed groups but enjoys the camaraderie of her female group of friends. “Riding with these women has been life-saving—it really has,” she says. 

Julie Olson, another woman in the group, has been riding with some of the women for 30 years. As a result, they are incredibly fit. “We are still in pretty good shape compared to other women in their 40s or even 30s,” she says.

Outdoor sports for everyone

Breaking down boundaries in the fitness world often begins with challenging the restrictive expectations of who gets to do what kind of activity. Anthony Taylor has been doing that for 20 years, ever since he first got into cycling, bike racing, and bike touring. 

When he first got involved with the bicycling world, Taylor, who is black, quickly realized that it didn’t include very many people of color. Over the last two decades, Taylor has worked to make not just biking more accessible to communities of color, but also trail running, cross-country skiing, rock climbing, and snowboarding. Whether it’s through Major Taylor Bicycling Club of Minnesota, or his advocacy with the National Brotherhood of Cyclists and the League of American Bicyclists, or as a commissioner on the Metropolitan Parks and Open Space Commission, Taylor has been a staunch supporter of initiatives that increase outdoor fitness opportunities for communities of color. 

Currently working as the adventures director for the Loppet Foundation, Taylor seeks to debunk narratives that only white people, or rich people, or men participate in outdoor sports. “People say that stuff, and what they are acknowledging is that that’s the narrative that they heard,” he says. “Sometimes, all I do is show up and break the narrative, but at the same time, if I’m going to do a snowboard program for women and girls, guess who the leaders are going to be?” 

For Taylor, making fitness more inclusive means broadening the view of what healthful living is. “We change the attention away from the sport to one that is really about active living, personal progression, reclamation of health, reclaiming geography, and living locally,” he explains. “Community connectedness is the ultimate level of success.” 

Danek running through a patch of trees // Photo by Nate Ryan

Danek running at Theodore Wirth Regional Park // Photo by Nate Ryan

Community is also important to Carly Danek, a photographer for KARE 11 who loves long-distance running (she has completed six marathons and two 50K trail races) and often runs with the groups Mill City Running and the November Project. “I rarely run alone anymore,” Danek says. “For anyone that’s thinking about long-distance running, finding your people is so important.” 

In particular, Danek says she intentionally surrounds herself with individuals of as many different body types as possible. “It has helped me travel through space differently,” she says. “I look at people and say, ‘This is what real people look like.’ Bodies come in all shapes and sizes.” 

This realization and reminder is important because as a young person, Danek thought she had to lose weight in order to be able to do anything physical. “There were no large people in popular culture doing anything fun or adventurous or athletic,” she says. “I want people of any size to know that they can show up and live life regardless of how they feel about their body. There’s no reason to wait. I think it took younger me a while to learn that lesson.”

Yoga beyond Instagram

Yoga is another realm that, at least in the way it’s often presented in the media and by Instagram influencers, has a very specific, very narrow type of physique, despite its roots as an Indian spiritual practice. That’s one of the reasons Jennifer Gray opened her own studio back in 2000. When Gray started practicing yoga, she had a larger body and had to force herself not to compare herself to others in the class or to look in the mirrors. “There was a feeling of being judged in class,” she says. Gray wanted a place that would make everybody at every time in their life feel welcome, so she began teaching a class called “Big A#%! Yoga” specifically aimed at larger bodies. “You don’t even think twice about being in that room. And that was something that was important to me,” she says.

Celia McCoy now teaches a class similar to “Big A#%! Yoga” at the Yoga Center Retreat in St. Louis Park, where Gray is CEO and program director, though with a different name: “Viniyoga–for EveryBODY.” Like its predecessor, McCoy’s class is specifically meant for folks in larger bodies. “It’s a space meant for fat folks, but other people can come into it,” McCoy says. 

Galos doing yoga // Photo by Nate Ryan

Galos doing yoga // Photo by Nate Ryan

Dylan Galos has a similar ethos for his classes. He has barred the phrase “full version of a posture,” explaining that if students in his class can do more complex postures, there is space available for them to express that part of their practice. Otherwise, postures are introduced “without hierarchy,” he says. 

Galos himself got serious about yoga after a motorcycle crash seven years ago. “I wanted to get into a modality that incorporated philosophy and mindfulness,” he says. As a large black man, though, he didn’t exactly blend in with the typical clientele of most yoga classes. “Every time I went to class, I felt like I stuck out like a sore thumb,” he recalls. But as soon as class began, none of that mattered: “I focused on the strength and peace that showed up inside.”

Ultimately, that’s what any kind of fitness or wellness is about: doing what helps you become your best self, even if you don’t look like everybody else. 

From Zero to 629.4: Tackling the North Star Bike Race — Installation 1

Eli Radtke poses for a portrait with his Trek bike // Photo by Ryan Radtke

Eli Radtke poses for a portrait with his Trek bike // Photo by Ryan Radtke

When I announced to my family in February that I intended to participate in an unsupported, 629.4-mile bike race this September, they started planning my funeral.

When I get up in the morning and look in the mirror, I see an oft-unemployed 25-year-old man, roughly 40 pounds overweight, balding and out of breath from climbing up the stairs.

Let’s just say I’m not on any shortlists for endurance racing events.

So, when my friend told me about the North Star Bike Race (NSBR), I politely said I would think about it, fully intending not to. But I was curious. So, I investigated.

The NSBR is a solo, unsupported endurance race following U.S. Bicycle Route 41 from St. Paul to Grand Portage and back. This race is especially remarkable because it is unsupported: there are no stages to rest, refuel, and regroup. No gear vans. No coaches for moral support and advice. No hotel reservations before the race begins or sending supplies forward. Just you, whatever you can carry on your bike, and the road. For 629.4 miles.

Easy, right?

That night, staring at the mountain my stomach made under the blanket, I thought about the race. A feverish energy gripped me. I needed to shake things up, do some living! The small masochistic part of my brain banged its proverbial fist in approval. Satisfied with my new life plan, I fell asleep with triumphant visions of the new and improved me.

My delusions of grandeur had not faded by the morning. The race was so far away I would surely be in the best shape of my life by then, ready to tackle the challenge. Before I could change my mind, I emailed the organizer of the race and gave them my information and my intent to participate. That’s how, in the midst of the polar vortex, I found myself on the roster of the second annual NSBR.

As any nerd-gone-athlete story goes, I started with research. I looked up bike schematics, documentaries, and all-things endurance bike racing. I discovered life-changing anecdotes from similar events. My family, on the other hand, found stories of bikers struck by cars and killed. I decided to stop bringing it up around the dinner table.

Thankfully I found other outlets in which to discuss my plans. A group of friends had also signed up for the race and we all agreed we should train together. As we sat down to talk about the journey, it became clear we had different ideas about pace. In unsupported races, participants can pedal as long and as far as they like with no restrictions. This was great news to me: slow and steady wins the race! My friends did not share my sentiment. We would be aiming to finish the race in six days, because anyone who didn’t was a scrub, according to them. Based on this bravado, I began putting together some time tables, looking at last year’s participants for some inspiration. Jon Lester, last year’s winner, biked all 629.4 miles in 44 hours and 50 minutes.

Naturally, this made me a little nervous. I took another look at just how far 630 miles is. Minneapolis to Madison is only 274 miles. To Chicago, it’s 408. St. Louis gets close at 537, but to Wichita is the closest to the mark at 635 miles. My butt hurt just looking at the map.

Maybe it would be better broken up. Splitting the race into six parts yields 104.9 miles a day. Assuming I will have to stop to resupply, my plan began to take shape around biking roughly 12 hours a day. I (generously) assumed that I will be averaging around 12–14 mph during the race, which, given all the other calculations meant that on a flat road at that speed, I would burn an estimated 9,600 calories per day. Clearly, consuming calories wouldn’t be my problem. Conditioning my body to be able to expend all that energy is another story.

Eli Radtke poses for a portrait with his Trek bike // Photo by Ryan Radtke

Eli Radtke poses for a portrait with his Trek bike // Photo by Ryan Radtke

I looked over my notes. Most people take months to train for just a single 100-mile ride. I am doing six such rides wrapped into one. It was then I realized what an enormous task it would be to turn my plushy body into a highly efficient machine in a little over seven months.

With February in full swing, road training was out. I pulled out my dad’s old road bike and set it up on rollers in an unfinished room in my basement. Illuminated by a single bare light bulb and surrounded by discarded objects, I went to work.

To start, I wanted to build endurance and work toward general fitness. I set my goal weight at 190 pounds on race day, and to get there I started biking 30‒60 minutes four to five times a week, with supplemental strength training. All done inside, in my basement. I decided to forgo a strict diet plan and instead be more conscious of what I ate. Dropping 30 pounds in seven months wasn’t going to be fun.

Now that I had my physical training started, it was time to find a bike. I needed to upgrade to something I could push to the limits without it falling apart on the side of the road. Additionally, I had to find that perfect bike on a part-time writer, part-time cook’s salary. This turned out to be harder than I thought.

I spent February exploring different Craigslist posts for bicycles. From this experience, I learned that: 1) Craigslist photo vs. reality is almost as bad as Tinder; and 2) bargaining with Minnesotans is about as fun and direct as running backwards.

Shady meetings in fast-food parking lots felt more like a hostage exchange than shopping. The sellers watched me hawkishly to ensure I wasn’t going to ride off into the sunset. My testing tracks were slushy Burger King drive-thrus and laps around Walmart shopping-cart corrals. None of the bikes felt right, but in weather barely above zero with five layers of clothing on, nothing felt quite right.

I decided that I would try a different approach, and went to The Hub Bike Co-Op in Minneapolis. There, I learned that the worst thing you can do if you are looking to buy a bike on a budget is to ride an expensive one.

The difference was like hearing your friend try to hum a song they are thinking of and seeing it live in the front row. Goodbye worn-down brake pads, hello disc brakes. Instead of scouring the depths of the web for parts, everything was brand new and perfectly assembled on the bike right there in front of me. I thought I had found the perfect solution—until I saw the price.

I went back to scanning Craigslist.

As snow emergencies littered the early days of March, training continued in the basement. I am still desperately out of shape and not looking forward to the 70-mile training rides I have planned in the spring, and still feel clueless.

But: I can feel myself getting stronger. For now, Craigslist bike-suitors will still have to watch me wobble around, dodging parked cars and potholes, before shaking my head and driving back home. I’ll just focus on what’s in front of me and take it one mile at a time.

This is part one of a three-part story about the NSBR. The next installation will be after the summer training period and before the race begins on September 11. To follow Eli through the doldrums of training and get a play-by-play of the complaints, follow him on Twitter at @Eli_ektdaR. 

Frontside 180: JXTA Arts turning vacant lot into a youth-designed art plaza and skatepark

A vacant lot in North Minneapolis is the site of JXTA Arts' youth-designed art plaza and skatepark // Photo by Tj Turner

A vacant lot in North Minneapolis is the site of JXTA Arts’ youth-designed art plaza and skatepark // Photo by Tj Turner

At the corner of Emerson and Broadway in North Minneapolis lies a small vacant lot in an otherwise bustling neighborhood. Though it may look empty and idle, the site is actually in the midst of a radical metamorphosis from a gravel lot into a youth-designed art plaza and skatepark.

Previously the home of youth arts organization Juxtaposition Arts’ business operations since 2004, the decrepit building had to come down this spring—a few years earlier than expected due to falling bricks that resulted in safety citations and mounting fines. Though they’d been planning to tear the building down for over a decade, the premature demolition left a blank canvas for the Northside youth arts organization to fill while they execute a four-year plan to raise $14 million for the new building.

“We didn’t want to leave it just as a blank spot,” says JXTA co-founder Roger Cummings. “We wanted to have it activated—wanted to make it a place for people to have lunch, to have meetings, to show projections and movies, to be a gathering place but also a place to be physically active.”

JXTA Arts founder Roger Cummings // Photo by Tj Turner

JXTA Arts co-founder Roger Cummings // Photo by Tj Turner

With a crowdfunding campaign in the works, Cummings called on City of Skate, a local coalition aiming to install world-class skateparks in the community, to consult on the project. They eagerly jumped on board, as did the West Broadway Coalition.

City of Skate co-founder Witt Siasoco says the decision to partner with a youth-oriented organization like JXTA was a no-brainer. “Skateboarding and creativity go hand in hand, especially because it is a youth culture,” he says. “JXTA comes out of a youth culture, it comes out of graffiti and hip-hop. Roger started off as a graffiti artist, and he knew what it meant to have spaces that were maybe illegal, or maybe it wasn’t signed off with parents. Skateboarding is that same way—I really love those aspects of skateboarding and youth culture, and that’s why the partnership is a perfect fit.”

A skater since the age of 10, Siasoco credits his exposure to skateboarding culture for leading him to his current career as an artist and graphic designer, citing magazines like Thrasher and TransWorld for sparking his obsession with design.

“There’s just so many creative aspects that come out of skateboarding, and it’s such a positive activity, kinesthetically, and also just creatively. It occupies every facet once you go down the rabbit hole,” he says. “You look at this graphic, then you start drawing, then you learn how to screenprint, then you learn how to make your own boards, then you learn how to sell them—there’s just so many things that you get passionate about with it. I know that a lot of these kids will totally grasp onto it if they’re not already involved.”

The youth apprentices involved in the skatepark project predominantly come from JXTA’s environmental design lab; about 10 students have rotated through the project over the last six months. To work in the JXTALab, youth apprentices must first go through the VALT (Visual Art Literacy Training) program. Once they graduate from VALT, they can apply for paid apprenticeships in environmental design, graphic design, screenprinting, public art/murals, contemporary art, and tactical urbanism, a term used to describe temporary, low-cost tactics to improve an urban environment in the interest of its community.

Though the apprentices involved with the project are working with City of Skate, the West Broadway Coalition, and JXTA instructors Niko Kubota-Armin and Sam Ero-Phillips, the students come up with many of the design concepts themselves.

JXTA Arts students review the plans for the new North Minneapolis skatepark and art plaza // Photo by Tj Turner

JXTA Arts students review the plans for the new North Minneapolis skatepark and art plaza // Photo by Tj Turner

“They’re the design talent,” says JXTA instructor Kubota-Armin, who’s also a practicing architect. “[Sam and I are] both in the industry, so we’re familiar with the vocabulary and teaching scale, things like that, but we try to translate it so that, as much as possible, the students are doing the work.”

“Whatever the project is, we try to find the appropriate way to use their talents, because often there’s stuff that they come up with that we never would’ve on our own,” Kubota-Armin adds. “So we try to harness the talent in the most productive way we can.”

The design chosen by the apprentices includes a skate park as well as green space, areas for people to come sit, and a performance space for concerts and events. Artistic elements will include sculpture and apprentice-designed mural panels invoking a “natural” theme, chosen in order to offset the heavy concrete of the skatepark.

The emphasis on the lot becoming a multi-use, public space is crucial to both Cummings and Siasoco. For Cummings, he wants anyone in the neighborhood looking for a place to hang out to feel welcome there. “We can’t just have a full skatepark and that’s it, that’s all it’s programmed to do—nobody can eat lunch there, anything like that. That would be not as powerful.”

For Siasoco, the importance of having the skatepark be open to the public is the driving force behind City of Skate. In fact, the organization first came together five years ago when the Minneapolis Parks and Rec board needed an advisory committee to map out a skatepark activity plan for the city. While he knows of several private skateparks around town—Familia HQ, Third Layer, and unnamed secret spots (you’ll never get him to spill on their whereabouts)—Siasoco’s focus is to work on places where skateboarding first started: public space.

“We need to start thinking about public spaces differently, and I think that’s a byproduct of skateboarding and it’s central to what we’re about,” he says. “Creating good public space is what skaters go to anyway. We don’t want to pave everything in concrete—you want to have trees, you want to have shade, you want to maybe have the ability to have something happening aside from skateboarding in that space. And that’s what this space will be.”

Two JXTA Art students mark the outline of the youth-designed art plaza and skatepark in North Minneapolis // Photo by Tj Turner

Two JXTA Arts apprentices mark the outline of the youth-designed art plaza and skatepark in North Minneapolis // Photo by Tj Turner

The skatepark and plaza project began earlier this year following a massively successful Kickstarter campaign; with funding in place and designs now in the final stages of approval with the city, and JXTA expects to break ground on the plaza next spring.

To put so much work and materials into something that will eventually be torn down (this is the same location where JXTA’s future new building will go, after all) may seem confusing, but its impermanence actually ties directly to the heart of JXTA’s founding mission: to create art that lives and functions in its moment.

“Just doing murals, we know that murals are temporary. There’s not gonna be a mural that stands forever,” says Cummings. “So once you give that to the community, it’s like, that’s it. They can take care of it, and if they want to hold it forever, that would be great. But we go into it knowing that pretty much anything is gonna be temporary.”

JXTA currently occupies four properties on the corner of Emerson and Broadway, including a gallery space, VALT headquarters, space for some of their JXTALabs, and a temporary warehouse space until their new building is up. Since its beginnings in graffiti and mural work, the organization has stayed nimble, constantly seeking creative fixes for ill-designed and underutilized spaces while providing a professional platform for young artists. Whether its an installation in the Guthrie or a skatepark to activate their own lot, JXTA is—at its core—a multi-purpose organization.

“It’s not just being an architect, but being an artist. Not just being a landscape architect, but being a designer,” says Cummings. “Coupling those things together, so that when you’re coming out of here you’re very multi-useful. Our buildings and our plazas and our places have to do that too—they have to serve more than one purpose.”

Both Cummings and Siasoco agree that JXTA students and the community as a whole could benefit from having access to an activity like skateboarding—something that involves little more than a board and the desire to skate. They also hope the temporary plaza will increase the want for additional multi-use skateparks down the road. Siasoco emphasizes that once you’ve got the board, you’re set. “From there, you don’t have to sign up for classes. All you have to do is roll down the street.”

Bells & Beers: Zombie Edition

Bells & Beers goes Zombie-style at HeadFlyer Brewing!

Get ready to kettlebell kick-it in your ghoulish gear on Saturday, October 13th – 11AM!
Minneapolis will be filled with Zombies for the Pub Crawl… Why not start your creepy crawling off with a killer workout + pint?! (Or just kick off your Saturday with us without the Pub Crawl action!)

Don’t miss out on this Zombie Themed Bells & Beers as we take over the HeadFlyer Brewing taproom for a crazy-fun, instructional (and kick-butt) kettlebell training session—followed by a delish post-workout pint.
Gore it up zombie-style and keep the party going all day long!

Best Zombified Bell Boss wins a free second pint!
Round up your super awesome buddies and nab your tickets now before they sell out!

Registration fee includes a 1-hour Kettlebell & Bodyweight Exercise workout and one beverage of choice.

Must be 21 years of age to register. All skill levels welcome.

CONTACT: edktrainingmn@gmail.com

Bringing Baseball to Mexico: Fundraiser and Equipment Donation

On a 2010 trip to Isla Mujeres near Cancun, Mexico, Jeff Cogbill saw a group of kids playing what he eventually realized was a version of baseball. Only instead of bats and balls and gloves, they had sticks and rocks bare hands. The sight upset the lifelong baseball lover and coach, especially as he thought about the fancy equipment being given to and used by kids of the same age back home—kids like Jeff’s own son.

When he returned home, Jeff told his son what he’d seen. Without pausing, his son responded, “Dad, we have all this gear laying around. Why don’t you go back and give it to those kids?” So, he did. The following year, Jeff flew back to Mexico and gave the kids as much equipment as he could bring with him.

Jeff and his son are returning to Isla Mujeres this December, and are hosting two events in October in support of the trip. As Jeff explains: “For our trip to Isla Mujeres over Christmas break, we are looking to raise enough money to cover baggage fees for the gear, and are looking to gather as much worn but functional gear as possible. That way the kids can learn the game the right way: with gear that performs like is should right from the start.”

In addition to the equipment, Jeff and his son will also be hosting a two-day baseball camp for the kids at Fisherman Baseball Stadium on Isla Mujeres during their time there.

EVENT 1

DATE: Friday, October 5

TIME: 3-7pm

LOCATION: Grumpy’s Bar and Grill, 2200 4th St. N.E., Minneapolis, MN 55418

DETAILS: Fair State Co-op, Castle Danger, Steel Toe, Modist, Dangerous Man, Indeed, and Barrel Theory will all be onsite pouring beer for $5 a pint, and Pat will be grilling Ball Park Frank’s. All proceeds will go toward covering baggage fees for the baseball gear. People are also invited and encouraged to bring lightly used baseball gear to donate.

EVENT 2

DATE: Saturday, October 6

TIME: 12-3pm

LOCATION: Starr’s Bar, 315 Wisconsin St. N., Hudson, WI 54016

DETAILS: Attendees of this family-friendly event are invited and encouraged to bring lightly used baseball gear to donate, and then stick around for a hot dog, root beer, and baseball-related games in the parking lot compliments of the Minnesota Twins & KMB Event Productions.

Jeff Cogbill is a sales representative at Fair State Brewing Co-operative. If you’d like to learn more about his initiative or donate money or gear to his effort, please contact him at Jeff@fairstate.coop

Bringing Baseball to Mexico: Fundraiser and Equipment Donation

On a 2010 trip to Isla Mujeres near Cancun, Mexico, Jeff Cogbill saw a group of kids playing what he eventually realized was a version of baseball. Only instead of bats and balls and gloves, they had sticks and rocks bare hands. The sight upset the lifelong baseball lover and coach, especially as he thought about the fancy equipment being given to and used by kids of the same age back home—kids like Jeff’s own son.

When he returned home, Jeff told his son what he’d seen. Without pausing, his son responded, “Dad, we have all this gear laying around. Why don’t you go back and give it to those kids?” So, he did. The following year, Jeff flew back to Mexico and gave the kids as much equipment as he could bring with him.

Jeff and his son are returning to Isla Mujeres this December, and are hosting two events in October in support of the trip. As Jeff explains: “For our trip to Isla Mujeres over Christmas break, we are looking to raise enough money to cover baggage fees for the gear, and are looking to gather as much worn but functional gear as possible. That way the kids can learn the game the right way: with gear that performs like is should right from the start.”

In addition to the equipment, Jeff and his son will also be hosting a two-day baseball camp for the kids at Fisherman Baseball Stadium on Isla Mujeres during their time there.

EVENT 1

DATE: Friday, October 5

TIME: 3-7pm

LOCATION: Grumpy’s Bar and Grill, 2200 4th St. N.E., Minneapolis, MN 55418

DETAILS: Fair State Co-op, Castle Danger, Steel Toe, Modist, Dangerous Man, Indeed, and Barrel Theory will all be onsite pouring beer for $5 a pint, and Pat will be grilling Ball Park Frank’s. All proceeds will go toward covering baggage fees for the baseball gear. People are also invited and encouraged to bring lightly used baseball gear to donate.

EVENT 2

DATE: Saturday, October 6

TIME: 12-3pm

LOCATION: Starr’s Bar, 315 Wisconsin St. N., Hudson, WI 54016

DETAILS:Attendees of this family-friendly event are invited and encouraged to bring lightly used baseball gear to donate, and then stick around for a hot dog, root beer, and baseball-related games in the parking lot compliments of the Minnesota Twins & KMB Event Productions.

Jeff Cogbill is a sales representative at Fair State Brewing Co-operative. If you’d like to learn more about his initiative or donate money or gear to his effort, please contact him at Jeff@fairstate.coop

Bells & Beers at FINNEGANS

Bells & Beers hits FINNEGANS again – kicking off FINNtoberfest!

Get your Fall Fitness going STRONG with EDK Training and FINNEGANS on Saturday, September 22nd!

Join the Bells & Beers Crew as we take over the FINNEGANS outdoor patio with this crazy-fun, instructional (and kick-butt) kettlebell training session – followed by a refreshing FINNEGANS post-workout pint.
You don’t want to miss this high-energy team training event – nothing beats swingin’, sweatin’ and sippin’ with fellow kettlebell (and beer) enthuisiasts! Round up your workout buddies and nab your tickets now…this event will sell out!

BONUS!! Hang around after Bells & Beers for FINNEGANS first FINNtoberfest! Live music, food, activities for all and plenty of beers and cheers!

FINNEGANS is the first beer company in the world to donate 100% of profits to feed those in need locally, partnering with a food bank in every state to fund local produce for local food shelves in every market dollars are raised. A portion of the proceeds for this Bells & Beers event will be donated back to the community!

Must be 21 years of age to register. All skill levels welcome.

Your registration fee includes a 1-hour Kettlebell & Bodyweight Exercise workout and one beverage of choice.
Come to Sweat… Stay for the Reward!

CONTACT: edktrainingmn@gmail.com

www.edktraining.com

4th Annual Big Wood Brewery Golf Tournament to Benefit Merrick, Inc.

Golf season is right around the corner and that means it’s almost time for our yearly day of giving, golf, beer, food, and fun!

The 4th Annual Big Wood Brewery Golf Tournament to Benefit Merrick, Inc. is scheduled for Friday, September 21, 2018 at Oak Glen Golf Course and Banquet Facility in Stillwater and the day will include an 18-hole round on their beautiful Championship Course, Big Wood beer, golf contests and prizes, a reception dinner featuring dishes cooked and paired with Big Wood beers, and an auction.

All proceeds will go to Merrick, Inc. of Vadnais Heights, a private nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation licensed by the Department of Human Services to provide Adult Day & Memory Care, Day Training & Habilitation, and Supported Employment.

For more information, click here.

 

Bells & Beers 3-Year Bash at 612Brew

Three years of Bells & Beers: We’re back at 612Brew where it all began!

We want you to experience a kick-butt outdoor workout and sip some fantastic local craft beer with us! Start your weekend off with this fun, challenging and instructional kettlebell training session – followed by an awesome 612Brew post-workout pint. We’re bringing the Bells & Beers party back to the 612Brew patio for a three-year B&B Bash you don’t want to miss!

We’ll be swinging bells, swigging beers and soaking up the summer sun. Plus, we’ll be giving away EDK swag, training deals and prizes! Get your friends on board, save your spots now and get ready to KB party!

Your registration fee includes a 1-hour Kettlebell & Bodyweight Exercise workout and one pint beverage of choice.

Must be 21 years of age to register. All skill levels welcome!!

High Intensity Happy Hour (Beer Brunch!) – Tin Whiskers Brewing

Not your ordinary Saturday Sweat… Join EDK Training at Tin Whiskers for HIHH.

Kick off your Saturday and bring on the heat with a fun and instructional Bodyweight Circuit Training workout (before regular taproom hours), then cool down after with a phenomenal TW craft brew. No equipment required for this bodyweight exercise class. Meet new workout buddies and have a total blast while you’re at it. This High Intensity Happy Hour is not one to miss – space is limited!

$18 includes HIHH + one pint beverage of your choice
Cash payment due day of event

Learn more here.

The Mill: Craft beer at Target Field for the Twins home opener

Target Field // Photo via the Minnesota Ballpark Authority

Target Field // Photo via the Minnesota Ballpark Authority

Though winter apparently will never end, time still moves on. Case in point: the Twins home opener is this Thursday, with a forecasted high of 36 degrees. There’s definite potential to set a record for lowest game day temp, which is currently sitting at 31 degrees in a game against the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

That being said, we’re here to help you plan your visit to Target Field. If you’ll be braving the cold at Thursday’s game, it’ll be more important than ever to know where you can find the food you’re looking for and, perhaps most importantly, the beer. Without further ado, here is a quick rundown of where and what you can find for Minnesota craft beers around the stadium.

In sections 116, 125, and 320 is Minnesota Brews, both of which you can find beer in cans and on draft. Fans can stock up on EPA and Maibock from Summit, Farm Girl Saison from Lift Bridge, good ol’ Premium and Nordeast from Grain Belt, as well as beers from Schell’s, FINNEGANS, Fulton, and more.

Other concession stands and portable booths selling craft beer—both Minnesotan and beyond—include those in sections 34, 110, 115, 119, 125, 126, 128, 223, and 305.

In addition to concession stands and portable booths, there are a slew of restaurants and bars serving up local craft beer. New this year is Bat & Barrel, located in the former Metropolitan Club at gate 34. The menu will offer items from an array of local restaurants including Murray’s, Red Rabbit, Kramarczuk’s, and Hell’s Kitchen. Better yet, there will be a self-pour beer wall with 22 beers on tap, including Surly’s limited-edition “Cut Down IPA,” brewed in collaboration with former Twins pitcher Glen Perkins.

Whether you’re staying warm or cooling off (granted this winter should cease eventually), no doubt that Target Field is well-stocked with Minnesota craft beers to kick your game day into full gear.

Drink

The exterior of Green Flash Brewing Company's Virginia Beach location // Photo courtesy Green Flash Brewing Company - Virginia Beach Facebook

The exterior of Green Flash Brewing Company’s Virginia Beach location // Photo courtesy Green Flash Brewing Company – Virginia Beach Facebook

After closing its Virginia Beach brewery at the end of March and announcing it would close its Cellar 3 location in San Diego due to financial woes, Green Flash Brewing‘s CEO Mike Hinkley announced Tuesday that the company’s “senior lender, Comerica Bank, has foreclosed on its loans and sold the assets of the Company (other than the Virginia Beach brewery) to WC IPA LLC through a foreclosure sale which closed on March 30, 2018. As such, the Company no longer owns the Green Flash and Alpine businesses.  Comerica Bank is currently conducting a separate process to sell the Virginia Beach brewery.” According to a press release, Green Flash and Alpine Brewing will continue to operate in San Diego and Alpine, respectively. Meanwhile, the Green Flash Brewhouse & Eatery in Lincoln, Nebraska, will open as scheduled in April, and will brew specialty beers serving the state of Nebraska.

For the first time in its history, the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild released a code of conduct that each member must sign before renewing their membership. There are three main clauses to the contract, with the first and most in-depth regarding the issue of harassment and discrimination. There’s also a new policy on the consumption of alcohol at MCBG events, requiring members to “promote and model responsible drinking at all times.” This advancement for the advocacy group, comprised of brewers, brewery owners, and industry professionals from all across the state, comes in light of mounting concerns over accusations of harassment and discrimination within the industry.

Flying Dutchman Spirits of Eden Prairie was awarded silver medals for two of its products by the American Distilling Institute at its 2018 Judging of Craft Spirits competition in Portland, Oregon. The world’s largest craft spirits competition recognized Flying Dutchman for its Mediterráneo Gin and its Nas-Drov-Via Vodka. Other Minnesota winners include Tattersall, Dampfwerk, RockFilter, and J. Carver.

Additionally, the American Distilling Institute awarded Los Angeles’ Lost Spirits Distillery with “Best Distillery Experience” at its 2018 annual conference. The distillery has been celebrated for its state-of-the-art systems of rapid-aging, which has been catching on among many whiskey distilleries in recent years.

Bernick’s acquired the distribution rights of the Duluth-based Rohlfing Distributing, which includes the Coors portfolio of brands, along with Summit, Corona, and Boston Beer Co. brands in a territory extending from the Hinckley area to the Canadian border. Bernick’s also is acquiring Rohlfing’s trucks and warehouse located in Duluth’s Lincoln Park neighborhood.

Out of left field, darling underdog Castle Danger Brewing came up and pummeled Surly in final round of the Star Tribune’s 2018 Ultimate Minnesota Beer Bracket. With 73 percent of the votes in the final round, Castle Danger easily swept the competition from a No. 2 seed, solidifying the top spot for the North Shore brewery.

The Underground Music Cafe is opening a second branch in downtown near Target Field. The cafe serving up a well-rounded combo of espresso, wood-fired pizzas, local beer, and live music will be three times the size of the original spot in Falcon Heights. The stage will feature daily cover-free shows from local musicians, with a focus on offering exposure to new and up-and-coming acts.

Food

The new "Princess of Pork" Karyn Tomlinson from The Corner Table // Photo via Cochon 555 Twitter

The new “Princess of Pork” Karyn Tomlinson from The Corner Table // Photo via Cochon 555 Twitter

Cochon555, a national tour to promote heritage breed pigs, made a stop in Minneapolis last weekend at the Loews Hotel for a full-hog showdown. Karyn Tomlinson of Corner Table brought home the bacon with her menu of Swedish spareribs, a Sunday ham sandwich, and an apple pie topped with liver ice cream. She’ll be awarded with four days in Rioja, Spain, and will compete for the top slot in the Grand Cochon in Chicago come late September.

Luke Shimp has been a busy guy, but apparently he’s not quite done. The restaurateur and founder of Red Cow and Red Rabbit is adding an event and catering space in Northeast Minneapolis to his resume. The space, expected to open next year, will be Shimp’s first venture in the Northeast neighborhood. Shimp currently operates all four Red Cow locations, Red Rabbit in North Loop, and soon another Red Rabbit location in St. Paul.

Patrons at Dangerous Man will soon be able to cut the cheese without shame or ridicule. Meaning, the brewery will begin selling cheeses from its Growler Shop this Thursday, with the option to either take it with you or enjoy it right there in the taproom. Cheeses available will be paired with the beers on tap, and boards and cheese knives will be available free of charge for those who don’t walk around with their own.

Eat Street’s StormKing BBQ, located right behind Black Sheep Pizza and operated by Black Sheep owner Jordan Smith, is drastically cutting back its business hours just nine months after opening. The critically acclaimed barbecue joint announced via Facebook that, after closing and reopening April 7, it will only be open Saturdays from noon to 5pm. The statement read, “We at StormKing LOVE barbecue and our barbecue lovers! On the other hand we HATE losing money and need to change how we operate.”

Sea Change, the Guthrie Theater’s first floor restaurant, is getting a major overhaul with the arrival of Chef Donald Gonzales. Gonzales previously worked with Thomas Keller at French Laundry, and most recently opened up Gray Duck in Lowertown. Theater-goers will still be able to enjoy a meal pre- or post-show, but Gonzales will also be aiming to bring in more non-theater crowds, as well provide catering options.

Culture

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ live Eagle Cam has kept audiences all over the country rapt since its start in 2012. The cam is located at an undisclosed eagle’s nest near the DNR’s HQ. But this winter, viewers have been noticing that the mother has been missing from her nest, exposing her eggs to the cold and wet that can often be detrimental to their development. With this week being Hatch Week, viewers are anxiously awaiting to see if the two remaining eggs will hatch, but the DNR says chances are slim. “Unfortunately, inconsistent incubation and wet, cool spring temperatures are unfavorable conditions for a successful hatch.”

Following the crowning of April as Minnesota Music Month, the Guthrie Theater announced plans for a special community event honoring the foremost Minnesota musician. “A Purple Celebration,” held in the first and fourth floor lobbies on April 16 from 8-11pm, will feature music and poetry by Prince, as well as performances by JD and Fred Steele with the Mill City Choir.

In lieu of paying mounting fines from the city, the co-directors of north Minneapolis’ Juxtaposition Arts made the tough decision to prematurely demolish their dilapidated building on West Broadway and Emerson Ave. The plan was always to move to a new home, but a new rule resulting in increased fines with each citation gave DeAnna and Roger Cummings the push they needed to take the leap. While they search for a new home base, the organization will establish an art park, designed by the young artists of Juxtaposition in collaboration with West Broadway Coalition and City of Skate, a skateboard park design firm.


The Mill is The Growler’s regular digest of all things new and notable in the world of food, drink, and culture. Stop back weekly for restaurant news, brewery rumors, and more. Have some news you want to share? Got some gossip to dish? Drop us a line at mill@growlermag.com.

Bells & Beers – HeadFlyer Brewing 03.17.18

We’ll be swinging bells, swigging beers and (sham)rocking out at HeadFlyer Brewing – kicking off St. Paddy’s Day on March 17.

Join the Bells & Beers Crew as we swing into spring with this crazy-fun, instructional (and kick-butt) kettlebell training session – followed by a refreshing HF post-workout pint. Green it up and wear your festively awesome St. Patrick’s Day workout gear!

Your registration fee includes a one-hour Kettlebell & Bodyweight Exercise workout and one beverage of choice. Register here.

Bells & Beers – Utepils Brewing 02.17.18

Bells & Beers hits a new host brewery on Saturday, February 17: Utepils Brewing.

Get ready to to fire up those pint-lifting muscles at Utepils Brewing – a new host location for our Bells & Beers kettlebell training sweat sessions. We can’t wait to take over the huge Utepils taproom for this crazy-fun morning of kettlebells and post-workout pints.

Your registration fee includes a one-hour “Kettlebell & Bodyweight Exercise” workout and one beverage of choice.

Must be 21 years of age to register. All skill levels welcome.

Register here.