The Growler: Issue 66 – April 2019 – Rebels

The Growler Magazine's Issue 66 cover art // Art by Mark Rivard, photo by Tj Turner

The Growler Magazine’s Issue 66 cover art // Art by Mark Rivard, photo by Tj Turner

“THINK FOR YOURSELF, QUESTION AUTHORITY!”

As a clean-cut freshman in high school, I remember seeing these words scrawled across the front cover of a friend of my brother’s notebook. As I was desperately trying to avoid trouble while navigating the halls and new rules of this private school, this senior was walking around flaunting his punk-rock Socratic mantra in the faces of the faculty. As a new student, it felt as rebellious as you could get. As the year progressed and I became more comfortable at the school and more confident in my own skin, I found myself inscribing the same message onto the (albeit, inside) cover my own planner.

While the act seems benign all these years later, the spirit of that message is as potent as ever. It’s the independent thinkers among us who question the status quo and start revolutions big and small, including the American craft beer revolution. Early craft brewers like Ken Grossman at Sierra Nevada, Jim Koch at Boston Beer, and Mark Stutrud at Summit Brewing didn’t waver in their campaign against the domestic light lagers that dominated the beer landscape in the 1980s.

This same rebellious ethos is easily recognizable in the in-your-face punk rock of bands like The Clash and The Sex Pistols. But it’s also embodied by people as unexpected as Fred Rogers of “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” who during the early days of television resisted the pull of commercialization in order to create a program that would educate children rather than leverage them to make money.

When driven by an inventive will and founded on a guiding principle, a subversive spirit can be harnessed into a powerful tool of creation. This month, we are featuring individuals and organizations doing just that. We visit the taproom at HammerHeart Brewing in Lino Lakes and drink in its ironclad Norwegian, black metal aesthetic. We spotlight several organizations taking art out of the auction house and museums and placing it into the hands of the public. And we speak with the fitness enthusiasts who are proving that an active lifestyle isn’t reserved to just one body type.

Change in this world often starts with an individual. So go ahead—question authority, think for yourself. We dare you.

Cheers,

Brian Kaufenberg
Editor-in-Chief

Culture

The north side of the JXTA building at 2007 Emerson Avenue North in Minneapolis // Photo by Daniel Murphy

The north side of the JXTA building at 2007 Emerson Avenue North in Minneapolis // Photo by Daniel Murphy

Art for the People
Local groups are changing the way art is consumed by putting it in the hands of the community.
By Eric Broker

Craft Culture
Bridging the Gap: Maggie Thompson uses art to navigate contemporary Native American identity.
By Lauren Sauer

No Labels, No Limits
Individuals of all ages, shapes, and identities are proving that fitness is for every body. 
By Sheila Regan

Artist Profile
Mark Rivard
By Lauren Sauer

The Genre Rebel
With fluidity, confidence and company, Bailey “26” Cogan shirks genre and makes music for joy.
By Lydia Moran, The Current

Growler Crossword
This month: ” Rebellion”
By Andrew J. Ries and Victor Barocas

Drink

A bottle of Otto’s Athens Vermouth // Photo by Aaron Job

A bottle of Otto’s Athens Vermouth // Photo by Aaron Job

Spirits Close-Up
Why You Hate Vermouth
By Zachary Sapato

Norwegian Nights
Hammerheart Brewing Company is an oasis of heavy beers and heavier metal.
By Paige Latham Didora

Wine Time
Let it Breathe: When to decant a bottle of wine.
By Brie Roland

Leaves of Change
Verdant Tea champions China’s unheralded family farms by going straight to the source.
By Isabelle Wattenberg

What We’re Drinking
April 2019
By The Growler Staff

 

Food

Doug Flicker sitting at the bar of Bull’s Horn in South Minneapolis // Photo by Tj Turner

Doug Flicker sitting at the bar of Bull’s Horn in South Minneapolis // Photo by Tj Turner

Recipe for Reinvention
For Doug Flicker, Bull’s Horn is a revolt against his own success and a return to his roots.
By James Norton

Cold Waves, Hot Ramen
Wherein the Boundary Waters sets its hook in the soul of a Minnesota chef.
By JD Fratzke

A Tale of Two Butcher Shops
In a society where meat is usually mundane, two Minneapolis businesses break the mold. 
By Susan Pagani

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